2011

Silver Screens Arts Festival

 

Eyes on the World – Unveiling the Myths

June 1–8, 2011

photographyspeakersmusictheatreartfilm
PHOTOGRAPHYSPEAKERSMUSICTHEATREARTFILM

wheelchair All SSAF workshops and events are accessible for persons with disabilities. Visit Silver Screens Arts Festival for details.

The Silver Screens Arts Festival 2011 runs from June 1–8, 2011 at Ryerson University.

 

­Wednesday, June 1, 2011

 

stripes

music

art
FREE
12:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
Campus area at Gould and Victoria streets
(near Heaslip House)

Opening Day Festivities
Live music, roving actors, and a variety of creative displays showcasing works by artists 50+.
Enjoy a beautiful visual history of ACT II STUDIO showcased by Bev Gray in Heaslip House, Room 303, June 1–3 from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
speakers2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.
Library Building
350 Victoria Street


Opening Day sponsored by
Chartwell logo

Sheldon LevyWelcome and Opening Remarks
Sheldon Levy
President and Vice-Chancellor,
Ryerson University




Opening Address
The Toronto Project
The Honourable David Crombie

David CrombieThe Toronto Project is a city’s story, as told in the digital age. David Crombie is a member of a consortium of individuals, organizations, institutions, and companies that have come together to create a unique “exhibit place unlimited by walls.” Come hear the story and learn how you can be part of this dramatic, interactive new project that will help us redefine this city.

David Crombie was a professor in political science and urban affairs at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute. He was elected mayor of Toronto in 1973 and elected to federal government in 1978. After retiring from political office, Crombie was appointed a commissioner of the Royal Commission on the Future of the Toronto Waterfront. Through the 1990s, he served in advisory capacities to city and provincial governments in the area of urban issues and was CEO of the Canadian Urban Institute. He was appointed the first Chancellor of Ryerson University in 1994 and in 2004 he was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.
stripes4:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.
Heaslip House
297 Victoria Street


Unveiling of a special gift from LIFE Institute in appreciation of 20 years of partnership with The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education.
Light refreshments to follow.
Note: A portion of proceeds from the 2011 Silver Screens Arts Festival will be donated to support a student in the Spanning the Gaps program (www.ryerson.ca/ce/access).

 

­Thursday, June 2, 2011

 

speakers10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Podium Building
350 Victoria Street


Challenges for Toronto – Looking to the Future
John Tory

John ToryJohn Tory will explore how myths of Toronto continue to change, and will share his personal reflections. He is passionate about the possibilities for Toronto’s economic, social, and environmental future, and how everyone from all walks of life can be involved.

John Tory is a lawyer, business leader, community activist, and broadcaster with a multitude of experiences.

He was formerly an elected representative serving as Member of Provincial Parliament. His career also included the Rogers Group of Companies both as President and CEO of Rogers Media Inc. and of Rogers Cable. He presently serves on the Board of Directors of Rogers Communications Inc.

Tory has an extensive background in volunteer community service with the Canadian Football League, as well as fundraising campaigns for St. Michael’s Hospital and the United Way, and he is currently chairing the fundraising campaign for the Toronto International Film Festival. His leadership skills can be seen in a wide range of charitable organizations ranging from autism to kids at risk, Canadian authors, and children with physical disabilities.

Tory was a founding Board Member and is the voluntary Chair of the Greater Toronto CivicAction Alliance (formerly Toronto City Summit Alliance). Currently, he is enjoying the role of radio talk show host with a daily three-hour show on Canada’s leading talk station Newstalk 1010.
speakers10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Do You See What I See?
Dr. John Turtle

Psychology has much to offer law enforcement and the legal system regarding eyewitness issues, figuring out human behaviour, and an evidence-based approach to developing policies and procedures. But at the same time, law enforcement and the legal system have their own constraints, laws, traditions, and politics that can limit the application of otherwise good ideas. Dr. Turtle’s research has focused on the overlap of psychology and the law and he presents startling and interesting analysis around the psychology of everyday beliefs and skepticism in relation to law enforcement and the legal system.

Dr. John Turtle has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Alberta and a post-doctoral fellowship at University of British Columbia. His research interests have been in the overlap between psychology and the law, mostly concerning eyewitness evidence in criminal investigations and trials.
speakersFREE
12:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


All That Jazz – A LIFE Institute 20th anniversary moderator-led class
Harold Swartz

Explore the life and works of Nat King Cole.

Harold Swartz is a retired librarian and member of LIFE Institute with a passion for jazz and the stars in that genre. He will share music from his extensive personal collection.
 
A beautiful visual history of ACT II STUDIO is being showcased by Bev Gray in Heaslip House, 297 Victoria Street, Room CED 303 from 12:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
theatre1:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Theatre Out of the Box

Do you think you know the minds of older adults? This year’s collection of one-act plays may astonish you! Theatre Out of the Box presents nearly a dozen “brief but brilliant plays:” five by innovative professional playwrights, including Harold Pinter, and six new works by ACT II STUDIO playwrights on a variety of topics including urban collisions, image sculpting, and great reckonings. All of these plays will be performed and directed by ACT II STUDIO members.

Note for Thursday’s opening performance only:
The Stella Award

This award will recognize a 50+ playwright who has created a winning original play. Selected scenes from their play will be presented in a special reading

Sponsored by
Crabtree and Evelyn logo
speakers2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Library Building
350 Victoria Street


Reflection in the Hall of Mirrors
American Movies and the Politics of Idealism – The Bush Era
Kevin Courrier

In this lecture, instructor Kevin Courrier examines the movies of the era of George Bush Sr. In an age that Bush defined as a ‘kinder, gentler era,’ Courrier looks at how the times were anything but kind and gentle. By exploring the false picture of American renewal offered in Field of Dreams and contrasting it with the more complex view offered in the little seen True Believer, Courrier probes how, within each presidential era, the prophetic voice of American idealism gets invoked in their movies.

Kevin Courrier is a writer/broadcaster and film critic. He was co-host and producer of “On the Arts” for CJRT-FM for eight years, has written about film and popular culture for Box Office, The Globe and Mail, and the Toronto Star, and is the author of several books.
theatre7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Theatre Out of the Box
Repeat performance – see details above.

Sponsored by
Crabtree and Evelyn logo

 

­Friday, June 3, 2011

 

speakers10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Economic Outlook for Canada: The Increasing Impact of Global Developments

Paul Ferley, Assistant Chief Economist, RBC

Paul FerleyThe Canadian economy has long been influenced by the economic trends of its major trading partner the USA, reflecting the high degree of integration within sectors such as motor vehicle production. However, Canada is increasingly being impacted by rising incomes in a number of large emerging economies. The presentation will provide an economic outlook for Canada that highlights the influence, and potential risks, of both of these factors.

As Assistant Chief Economist, Paul Ferley is responsible for the analysis and forecasting of macroeconomic and financial market developments in Canada, the USA, and key overseas economies, and is a regular contributor to a number of RBC publications.

Ferley joined the Economics Department of RBC in 2007 after working for 20 years at another major financial institution where he was responsible for generating the macroeconomic outlook for the USA, Canada, and Canadian regional economies.

He is a member of the Economic Policy Committee of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and former member on the Editorial Board of Canadian Public Policy/Analyse de politiques. Ferley is also Past President and Director of the Toronto Association of Business and Economics (TABE).
speakers10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


The Sound of the Sacred: Music, Religion, and Spirituality
Dr. Graham Freeman

This lecture will examine the role of music in different religions throughout the world, focusing upon both the similarities and differences between them. Music is a significant factor in all of the world’s major religious practices in some form or another, and we will look at the ways in which music provides an atmosphere of mysticism, communion, and transcendence that ordinary speech or ritualized action cannot.

Dr. Graham Freeman is a lecturer at the University of Toronto and has taught at The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education at Ryerson University. He finished his Ph.D. in 2008 with a dissertation on modern musical aesthetics and English folk music.
 
Enjoy a beautiful visual history of ACT II STUDIO in Room CED 303 at Heaslip House, 297 Victoria Street, from 12:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
speakers2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Making a Difference – Your Next Best Step

There comes a moment in life when we realize that our regular routine has lost its meaning and somewhere there is an opportunity for us to make a difference – for us and for others. Come and hear our guest panel talk about what happened to them, why they made changes in their lives, and how it has affected many lives.

We are thrilled to have three unique and stimulating speakers on the panel:

Adina Lebo has been the Executive Director of the Motion Picture Theatre Associations of Canada (MPTAC) and the head of program promotion and marketing at TVOntario. She worked in Ottawa, as a researcher and then as a policy advisor within the Department of Communications. Her career also includes work in theatre at Theatre Passe Muraille, The Blyth Summer Festival, and The Shaw and Stratford Festivals. Lebo has recently brought her talent to help in advocacy for seniors’ issues and is now the Founding Chair of the new downtown Toronto CARP Chapter – fondly known as TO2.

Shirley LewisShirley Lewis is a retired librarian, children’s literature specialist, author, publisher, and book wholesaler. After a career spanning 50 years, she joined CUSO-VSO as a volunteer consultant and served in Ethiopia for five years. Her retirement project was a life-altering experience and Lewis will tell you how she came to her current position as Executive Director of CHEER (Children of Ethiopia Education Relief).

Rocco Rossi has had a diverse career: a business executive, a non-profit leader, a pilgrim, and a PC Party candidate. He has fed his own dreams by going on several “pilgrimages,” often converting them into fundraisers for key causes. Rossi has kayaked 490 km from Toronto to Ottawa, cycled 1,900 km the length of Yonge Street/Hwy 11 from Rainy River to Toronto, and three times has joined other pilgrims from around the world and walked 900 km along the fabled Camino de Santiago in Northern Spain. Rossi has been the CEO of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario and has run for Mayor of Toronto.
theatre2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Theatre Out of the Box
Repeat performance – see June 2, 2011 for details.

Sponsored by
Crabtree and Evelyn logo
film7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
Library Building
350 Victoria Street


Weekend Film Festival Opening

We welcome our film partner, Toronto International Film Festival’s Film Circuit. Each weekend screening will feature a Q & A with a guest reflector and our own film master, Kevin Courrier.

Behind the Bohemian Embassy (Canada)
Guest Reflectors: Christopher Valley Ban, Writer, Producer,
and Director, and Don Cullen, Impresario

Tracing the phenomenal rise, fall, and lasting influence of this sometimes infamous, now legendary, 1960s avant-garde Toronto coffee house, Behind the Bohemian Embassy is an original, inspiring, and humorous feature-length documentary.

For a generation of Canadian songwriters, poets, dramatists, and comics, this was the place to perform. Many legends hung out here, including folk singer Gordon Lightfoot, poet Margaret Atwood, playwright David French, and comic Lorne Michaels.

“When we started out, there were very few opportunities for our talented Canadian artists,” said Don Cullen, its impresario.

Don Cullen, the Bohemian Embassy’s impresario and self-titled “Ambassador,” is at the centre of the story as his reflections and observations of those iconic times come to the fore.

Christopher Valley Ban’s writing and production background includes independent dramas and documentaries. He is an experienced film editor, actor, and narrator. A number of his documentaries aired on Canada’s Bravo and his screenplays include The Chasm. Behind the Bohemian Embassy is his first feature-length documentary.

Reception will follow.


Event details are subject to change. Please visit www.silverscreens.ca for event updates.

 

­Saturday, June 4, 2011

 

film2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Library Building
350 Victoria Street


Nostalgia for the Light (Nostalgia de la Luz) (Chile)
English subtitles
Guest Reflector: Kevin Courrier, Film Critic

In Chile’s Atacama Desert, astronomers peer deep into the cosmos in search for answers concerning the origins of life. Nearby, a group of women sift through the sand searching for body parts of loved ones, dumped unceremoniously by Pinochet’s regime. Master filmmaker Patricio Guzmán contemplates the paradox of their quests.

By juxtaposing the quest of the astronomers with that of the grieving but determined women, Guzmán’s intimate and insightful documentary forces us to ask why, in a country where people are trying to determine what happened millions of light years ago, is there so much resistance to confronting the turmoil of the past 40 years?

What is most impressive about this articulate and moving film is the hope it inspires. We meet both professional and amateur astronomers working in a remarkable landscape, and we discover how the act of looking beyond ourselves, beyond our planet, can be both liberating and healing.

Kevin Courrier is a writer/broadcaster and film critic. He was co-host and producer of “On the Arts” for CJRT-FM for eight years, has written about film and popular culture for Box Office, The Globe and Mail, and the Toronto Star, and is the author of several books.
film7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
Library Building
350 Victoria Street


The Flight of the Red Balloon (Le voyage du ballon rouge)
(France/Taiwan)
– English subtitles
Guest Reflector: Adam Nayman, Film Critic

The Flight of the Red Balloon uses Albert Lamorisse’s 1956 The Red Balloon as a launching pad to suggest that, even in the days of meticulously planned play dates and endless soccer practices, there are certain things about childhood that don’t change much. The film draws a reassuring web between the old ways of life and the new, exploring the affection and sense of protectiveness that stressed-out modern parents feel for their children; the ways city children, specifically, respond to their environments, adamantly remaining childlike even in the midst of the symbols of progress.

The Flight of the Red Balloon is about loneliness and anxiety – not horrible, life-shattering loneliness and anxiety, but the kind that makes us human and sometimes even holds us together.

Adam Nayman is a film critic in Toronto for Eye Weekly and Metro. He has contributed articles to Elle Canada, Film Comment, Cinema Scope, and Montage, and is a member of the Toronto Film Critics Association. In 2009, he graduated from the University of Toronto with a Master’s degree in Cinema Studies.

 

­Sunday, June 5, 2011

 

film10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Library Building
350 Victoria Street


Kevin’s Pick:
The Best of Youth (La meglio gioventù) (Italy)

English subtitles
Guest Reflector: Kevin Courrier, Film Critic

“Every review of The Best of Youth begins with the information that it is six hours long. No good movie is too long, just as no bad movie is short enough. I dropped outside of time and was carried along by the narrative flow; when the film was over, I had no particular desire to leave the theater, and would happily have stayed another three hours.” – Roger Ebert

The Best of Youth Part 1 (3 hours)
(Box lunch included)
The Best of Youth Part 2 (3 hours)


This film is ambitious. It follows two brothers and the people in their lives from 1963 to 2000, following them from Rome to Norway to Turin to Florence to Palermo and back to Rome again. Their lives intersect with the politics and history of Italy – the hippies, the ruinous flood in Florence, the Red Brigades, kidnappings, hard times and layoffs at Fiat. Finally a certain peace comes for some of the characters and for their nation.

Because of the length of the film, the director Marco Tullio Giordana has time and space to work with, and we get a tangible sense of the characters growing older, learning about themselves, and dealing with hardship.The film does not move towards the traditional ending you can anticipate but rather into a future that is shaped in surprising ways.
film10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Podium Building
350 Victoria Street


And We Knew How to Dance (Canada)
Guest Reflector: Maureen Judge, Director

And We Knew How to Dance is a moving and spirited documentary that looks back at the transformation of women’s lives during the First World War. The film weaves together the triumphant stories of women, aged 86-101, who lived and worked as nurses, munitions workers, farmerettes, and ambulance drivers.

Maureen Judge is a Toronto filmmaker and has taught about documentary film in Ryerson University’s G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education. She has an M.A. in Cinema Studies from NYU and her films include the Genie award-winning, Unveiled: The Mother Daughter Relationship; In My Parents’ Basement; and Mom’s Home. She was nominated for a 2009 Gemini Award as a producer of the documentary FLicKeR.
film1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Podium Building
350 Victoria Street


Unveiled: The Mother Daughter Relationship (Canada)
Guest Reflector: Maureen Judge, Director

This award-winning documentary is a revealing look at mothers and their young adult daughters in the throes of planning a wedding. With humour and intelligence, it delves into the myths and realities of the relationship as it cuts to the heart of the mother/daughter bond.

Maureen Judge is a Toronto filmmaker and has taught about documentary film in Ryerson University’s G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education. She has an M.A. in Cinema Studies from NYU and her films include the Genie award-winning Unveiled: The Mother Daughter Relationship; In My Parents’ Basement; and Mom’s Home. She was nominated for a 2009 Gemini Award as a producer of the documentary FLicKeR.

 

­Monday, June 6, 2011

 

 10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Demystifying Technology: Separating the Hype from the Reality
Dr. Wendy Cukier

There is lots of buzz about technology – from Facebook to Twitter, from Google to YouTube, from iPhones to BlackBerrys, and from Wi-Fi to 3G. But what does it all mean? And more importantly, why should you care? Technology is only a tool and this session will provide a context for understanding recent developments and for learning some of the basics.

With over 20 years’ experience as a consultant to industry and government, Dr. Wendy Cukier has led the design and redevelopment of the Ted Rogers School of Information Technology Management, the Joint Graduate Program in Communication and Culture (with York University), and Ryerson’s MBA programs. She has authored two books and has presented over 200 papers and articles to trade, press, and leading media. Dr. Cukier is an active member of the Toronto Regional Immigrant Employment Council (TRIEC) and the Diversity Forum of the Toronto Board of Trade.
artFREE
12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.
(following Dr. Cukier’s presentation)
Digital Media Zone
10 Dundas Street East, Room AMC-502


Tours of the Digital Media Zone (DMZ) at Ryerson University

Students will conduct tours of this new and innovative digital media centre that encourages and incubates entrepreneurial projects.
speakersFREE
2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Recording Recollections

Share personal reflections of earlier days with members of our Recording Recollections program in LIFE Institute at Ryerson University.
speakersFREE
2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Spadina House – An Artist’s Perspective
Osnat Lippa

At Nuit Blanche 2010, artist Osnat Lippa was one of a group of artists presenting “Under the Surface” – a look at the history of Spadina House and its occupant family. Lippa’s work told the story of the family members and the house as they lived in it during the thirties. She was lucky enough to meet a descendant of the patriarch of the Austin family during the exhibit of her multi-media work on the grounds of the house. Lippa will discuss her research into the family and the house, and its importance to the city of Toronto, and display her work from that exhibit.

Osnat Lippa graduated in art and design from London Guildhall University with postgraduate work in digital imaging. She has taught in London, England, and worked as a freelance illustrator.
speakers7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


This evening event is sponsored by
The Ownership Group

Opening: Evan Carter, Comedian

Evan CarterThis evening will begin with Evan Carter, comedian. Carter has been called a “young Bill Cosby” and as a 50+ adult he understands that times are changing and that things are not always easy! Carter spends his time observing the world through his eyes – the eyes of a father, husband, son, and friend. His likes, dislikes, and especially what confuses him today provide an endless source of fascination and material.

Evan Carter is a Toronto-based comedian who has opened for Gladys Knight, The Temptations, and Dionne Warwick, along with many other top artists.

Keynote Presentation: Navigating the Second Half of Life with Vitality, Creativity, and Meaning
Dr. Fred Mandell

Fred MandellLeonardo Da Vinci, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, Berthe Morisot – these are some of the greatest creators in history. What do these artists have in common with people in the midst of a major life transition? The skills they used to produce their masterpieces are the same skills required to make successful shifts – whether it’s finding a new career or a new purpose or calling in life. Former business executive, artist, and creative catalyst Dr. Fred Mandell argues that at its heart, life change is not an orderly step-by-step process. Instead, like all creative processes, it is full of stops and starts.

Dr. Fred Mandell’s 21-year career at American Express Financial Advisors led them to top rankings. He is co-developer of The Leader’s Studio, a unique professional development program for CEOs and senior executives and The Innovation Studio, for leaders and teams charged with accelerating innovation in their organizations.

Dr. Mandell’s life and work has been featured in the Public Television Series “Boomers; Redefining Life After 50.” He has been asked to advise the national conference on “Increasing the Utilization of Workers Age 55+” in Washington, DC. In addition he has been featured or quoted in numerous national newspapers, magazine, and TV media including The Wall Street Journal, The Conference Board, and Money Magazine.

 

­Tuesday, June 7, 2011

 

speakers10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Interesting Life Journeys
Valerie Pringle

Valerie PringleFamed broadcaster, television host, and journalist Valerie Pringle will share some of the interesting stories of her life’s journey (and she has a tremendous array of them) and why some issues and events have struck chords with her more than others.

The Banff Television Foundation selected Valerie Pringle as one of the Fifty Famous Faces of Fifty Years of Canadian Television. Pringle also climbed to the base camp at Mount Everest to do a series of reports for Discovery Channel. And she did 33 episodes of her travel series, Valerie Pringle Has Left the Building, for CTV.

Pringle is the chair of the Board of The Trans Canada Trail, and a member of the foundation boards for The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and the Board of Niagara Project. As the mother of a daughter who suffers from anxiety and panic attacks, Pringle has a personal stake in bringing awareness to mental health issues.

A graduate of Ryerson’s Radio and Television Arts program, Pringle is recognized for her contributions to the communications field and as an advocate. She is an accomplished master of ceremonies and delivers presentations that focus on bringing people together to find solutions, whether it’s about mental health, empowering women, or workplace awareness.

Sponsored by
Chartwell
speakers2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


The Forest and the Child: A Route to End Climate Change
Dr. Diana Beresford-Kroeger

Trees have been integral throughout human history as a source of shelter, providing wood for building materials and everything from boats to furniture. Almost half of all modern medicines and food products come from trees. Dr. Diana Beresford-Kroeger will talk about the importance of trees, how unaware we are of their ability to change our lives, and more importantly what steps each of us can take to protect the integrity of our world. Two of her books – The Global Forest and Arboretum Borealis: A Lifeline of the Planet – will be the basis for her talk.

Dr. Diana Beresford-Kroeger is a scientist who has studied classical botany, medical biochemistry, organic and radionuclear chemistry, and experimental surgery in Ireland, the USA, and Canada. She has lectured internationally and worked as a research scientist at the Canadian Department of Agriculture and the University of Ottawa School of Medicine. In 2005 CBC’s flagship program Ideas aired “The Ideas of Diana Beresford-Kroeger” and her research garden was filmed in 2008 on Recreating Eden. In 2010, Dr. Beresford-Kroeger was named a prestigious Wings Fellow by Wings World Quest for her scientific research and discovery.
music7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m. (reception will follow the event)
The Arts & Letters Club
14 Elm Street


Music LIVE! A Joyful Evening Concert
Joan Lee – concert pianist
Sharlene Wallace – harpist

A lovely evening of piano and harp. Join us at The Arts & Letters Club for a wonderful concert featuring two talented performers: Joan Lee and Sharlene Wallace.

Toronto native Joan Lee has played the piano since age three or four and gave her first solo recital at age eight. She played with the Royal Conservatory Symphony Orchestra in Massey Hall when she was 15. As a young adult, Lee decided to pursue a career in business and was very successful. In 2008 she returned to her music and since 2009 her public performances of classical music have once again thrilled audiences.

Sharlene Wallace is one of Canada’s most prolific and influential Celtic/lever harpists. Winner of two international lever harp competitions, she is versatile on both classical and lever harps, performing as guest soloist on both instruments with symphony orchestras and performing in numerous festivals and concert series across North America and in Europe. Wallace has been involved in commissions for the lever harp by several Canadian composers as well as writing numerous pieces for harp herself, many of which she has recorded on each of her five CDs.

Wallace is on the faculties of York and Guelph Universities teaching classical and lever harps. Sheis Principal Harpist with the Oakville and Kingston Symphonies.

Sponsored by
Coleford Investment Management Ltd

 

­Wednesday, June 8, 2011

 

speakers10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


A Prescription for Change in Ontario’s Public Education System
Annie Kidder,
Executive Director, People for Education

Annie Kidder Annie Kidder reflects on a discussion paper and recommendations recently released calling for Ontario to rethink policies affecting education in the province. She brings us her passion and drive for a better approach to our education system and the use of our schools, and calls on leadership to consider changes in municipalities and school boards, schools, faculties of education, staffing and training, and for families.

A former theatre director, Annie Kidder initially became involved in education through the Home and School Association at her children’s school. In February 1996, she helped found People for Education, a parents’ organization dedicated to the ideal of a publicly funded education system that guarantees every child access to the education that meets his or her needs. People for Education promotes greater civic engagement in the public education system; conducts ongoing research into the effects of policy and funding changes on schools; and coordinates a comprehensive communications strategy focused on education issues.
film11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.
Rogers Communications Centre
80 Gould Street


Invisible City (Canada)
Guest Reflectors:
Hubert Davis, Director, and
O’neil Edwards, Director, Spanning the Gaps to Post Secondary Education, The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education, Ryerson University

In the inner city housing project of Toronto’s Regent Park, Kendall and Mikey (like their surroundings) are in the process of transformation; the environment and social pressures are tempting them to make poor choices; their mothers and mentors are rooting for them to succeed. Turning his camera on the often ignored inner city, Academy Award nominated director Hubert Davis sensitively depicts the disconnection of urban poverty and race from the mainstream.

Hubert Davis’ very first film, Hardwood, was nominated for an Academy Award in 2005 and an Emmy in 2006. His next film, Aruba, helped him win the Don Haig award in 2007, given at Hot Docs to an “emerging filmmaker whose work has bridged the documentary and fiction filmmaking worlds.”

O’neil Edwards will reflect on how Spanning the Gaps has made a difference in the lives of the people in the film as well as others.

Spanning the Gaps is an initiative based on the belief that education can break the cycle of intergenerational poverty and social exclusion, and that higher education transforms lives and contributes to social cohesion, social stability, and a civic society.
Note: A portion of proceeds from the 2011 Silver Screens Arts Festival will be donated to support a student in the Spanning the Gaps program (www.ryerson.ca/ce/access).