FAQ

1. What is food security?

2. Where do Certificate in Food Security graduates find work?

3. Are all Certificate in Food Security courses offered via distance education?

4. How long are the courses?

5. How do I apply to register for the Certificate in Food Security?

6. How much time do I have to complete the certificate?

7. Can I receive credit for courses I've already taken?

8. Can I count Certificate in Food Security courses as part of my graduate studies program?

9. I’ve never taken a course via the Internet. How does it work?

10. How good do my computer skills need to be?

11. What are the technical requirements?

12. Do I have to be online at specific times?

13. I don’t live in Toronto. How will I write my final examinations?

14. Can I work and take a course at the same time?

15. Can I complete the Certificate in Food Security by attending on-campus courses?

­1. What is food security?
Food security is the condition in which all people at all times can acquire safe, nutritionally adequate, and personally acceptable foods in a manner that maintains human dignity.

­2. Where do Certificate in Food Security graduates find work?
Program graduates are employed by

  • domestic and international agencies as well as non-governmental organizations that address hunger and poverty,
  • community development organizations,
  • public health agencies, and
  • university-based institutes and centres.

Over the next five years, we expect significant job growth within food/community development organizations, public health units, and international development agencies. It’s also likely that urban planning organizations and government agriculture departments will be hiring people with food security expertise.

­3. Are all Certificate in Food Security courses offered via distance education?
The program’s three core courses are all offered via the Internet (and less frequently as on-campus courses). Most of the electives are also offered online (see exceptions listed in The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education Courses and Programs).

That means you can complete the entire program online!

­4. How long are the courses?
Each course is organized in 13 modules covering 13 weeks. The first week usually covers introductory material and the final examination is usually held during the last week.

­5. How do I apply to register for the Certificate in Food Security?
See Registration in a Certificate Program for further details. You must apply before completing 50 percent of the courses that you want to count toward the certificate, and in advance of published deadlines. Consult Important Dates for upcoming certificate registration deadlines. Many students register in the certificate during their first course so that they have early and online access to enrolment in further courses.

­6. How much time do I have to complete the certificate?
You have six years to complete the Certificate in Food Security from the time you begin your first Food Security course.

­7. Can I receive credit for courses I’ve already taken?
Yes. You can receive Transfer Credits for certain courses taken in a different program at Ryerson or another accredited post-secondary institution.

­8. Can I count Certificate in Food Security courses as part of my graduate studies program?
Because each graduate faculty sets its own rules, we can’t guarantee it. In our experience, though, many are willing to count one or more of our certificate courses as part of graduate students’ programs. Please ensure you check with you graduate studies coordinator to learn about the rules governing your situation.

­9. I’ve never taken a course via the Internet. How does it work?
Our distance education Internet courses are posted on password-protected websites. They use a learning program called D2L Brightspace. When you register for a course you’ll receive information on how to access your course site. Each week course content is posted to the site, along with required readings and exercises. We also include discussion questions to which all learners are expected to respond – this happens online through a dedicated “Discussion Area” on the site. You’ll also submit your assignments using D2L Brightspace’s mail facility.

­10. How good do my computer skills need to be?
If you’ve made it this far, you're probably ok. Distance education’s D2L Brightspace program is designed to help you effectively manage technical questions with easy-to-follow instructions and online help.

­11. What are the technical requirements?
Visit the distance education site for full technical specs.

­12. Do I have to be online at specific times?
No. But it’s very important to stick to the weekly schedule in order to keep up with group discussions. If you fall behind, it’s difficult to contribute to these conversations.

­13. I don’t live in Toronto. How will I write my final examinations?
Most Certificate in Food Security courses have take-home or online examinations. For some courses it might be necessary for us to set up a place for you to write your examinations near where you live.

­14. Can I work and take a course at the same time?
Yes. Our courses are designed to accommodate busy people. But how well you do will depend on your ability to juggle your work and learning (and any other commitments you might have). As long as you can keep up with the weekly readings, assignments, and discussions, you should be fine.

­15. Can I complete the Certificate in Food Security by attending on-campus courses?
Continuing education students may be able to access some courses on campus in the classroom. But you will still have to take some of the courses online via distance education.

If you are registered in the Ryerson University School of Nutrition, you might be able to take enough courses in the classroom to fulfill the Certificate in Food Security requirements. These courses are, though, offered less frequently than the online continuing education courses.